• Anjum Rahmatulla

SELF PRESCRIBERS, Why is a full consultation different from an acute one?



For many self prescribers, it may seem strange that homeopaths recommend ‘constitutional’ treatment for many problems or issues. After all, if homeopathy can treat acute conditions well, then surely the same approach works with longer standing problems??


Let me tell you the reasons why chronic or constitutional prescribing is DIFFERENT from acute prescribing.


Acute prescribing looks at the acute problem ONLY. You take the details of what is happening NOW with the patient, how they are presenting, how they are feeling and what makes the problem better or worse. The emphasis is on THE ACUTE SITUATION and the HERE AND NOW.


Chronic prescribing looks at a much bigger picture. The focus is on finding what is out of balance, and whether a cause can be identified. This entails looking into a person’s medical history, family medical history, their sleep patterns, dreams and fears, their food likes and dislikes, weather preferences, and the type of person they are. It is detailed and focussed not just on the here and now but on the PAST and the PRESENT. It is also looking in DETAIL at many OTHER FACTORS that are not considered when taking an acute case.

Chronic prescribing can take many forms. Did you know there is more than one way to apply homeopathic principles? Here are just a few:

  • A prescription based on a past illness, trauma or event, rather than on what the patient/client presents with.

  • Miasmatic prescribing which seeks to deal with inherited blocks/weaknesses.

  • Prescribing organ specific remedies if such support is needed.

  • Constitutional prescribing


Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash

I won’t bore you with more. I hope that I have shed some light on this subject that professional homeopaths are trained in different ways to help their clients. It is a lifelong journey.

And understanding the unique qualities of every person that crosses our threshold is always the key requirement. There is NO ‘one size fits all’.

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